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One thing you notice on the archive tape is a few seconds after going back to Gordon Honeycombe in Camden, there's a picture roll and the clock disappears, presumably that's them switching the source recording to tape from an off-air recording to a studio feed.

Back when Moving Image used to have a searchable database- highly detailed with LOADS of clips, it was a great resource, you could see that how they recorded the output varied from day to day. Some day it was as-broadcast with the clock and adverts, some days was a raw studio feed with no clock and stayed on the studio while adverts were shown (one of their clips was of Michael Parkinson talking to Raymond Burr while waiting to go on air), there were even a couple where you saw the studio output but still heard the adverts. They didn't ever seem to settle on how they did it either, even in 1992 it was varying from day to day.

The Moving Image website even had some videos of the advert breaks, and even a couple of the IBA startup card! Was sad when they farmed the TV-am clip sales out to AP and it all disappeared.
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(18-07-2024, 10:00 PM)James2001 Wrote:  One thing you notice on the archive tape is a few seconds after going back to Gordon Honeycombe in Camden, there's a picture roll and the clock disappears, presumably that's them switching the source recording to tape from an off-air recording to a studio feed.

Back when Moving Image used to have a searchable database- highly detailed with LOADS of clips, it was a great resource, you could see that how they recorded the output varied from day to day. Some day it was as-broadcast with the clock and adverts, some days was a raw studio feed with no clock and stayed on the studio while adverts were shown (one of their clips was of Michael Parkinson talking to Raymond Burr while waiting to go on air), there were even a couple where you saw the studio output but still heard the adverts. They didn't ever seem to settle on how they did it either, even in 1992 it was varying from day to day.

The Moving Image website even had some videos of the advert breaks, and even a couple of the IBA startup card! Was sad when they farmed the TV-am clip sales out to AP and it all disappeared.

I suspect it was more with the clips that Moving Image put on the website, as it makes more sense they'll have clean and as broadcast/off-air editions and maybe selectively clean (ie graphics but no clock, clock but no graphics, etc) on a server somewhere. TV-am's final broadcast on the Archive channel is the best example - the final "1983-1992" graphic is up for longer on that clip than it ever was on original broadcast, which suggests they found a studio recording for that clip. The archive channel is also a mixture of studio and as-broadcast clips with varying levels of graphics and sounds.

Indeed they used a clip from TV-am on one of those "before they were famous" shows on ITV, and it was somebody who was one of the back-up "dancers" for want of a better verb when Lizzie Webb was prancing around in a tracksuit, and how much fun it was (or was not as the case may be!) to be doing that at at seven in the morning. Anyway the clip to illustrate this had the original clock on the footage. I'm 95% certain I've seen that same segment in some other similar programme with other surrounding waffle but the clip then had no clock on it.
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(18-07-2024, 08:07 PM)Neil Jones Wrote:  The question probably answers itself as otherwise they wouldn't have traipsed down the road to Thames in the first place, but did Eggcup House not have its own generator? Has there ever been a requirement for such a thing? For TV-am its probably more understandable not having one, only being on air for like 24hrs a week or so...

There's a bit of detail on this here:
youtu.be 
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(18-07-2024, 06:29 PM)WMD Wrote:  I’d love to know what those short breaks in Open Air were all about that morning. I remember watching live at the time, and there was no glitching so it was unclear why they needed to bail out to a holding slide rather than continue the programme. (I was watching on BBC1 Hannington which was rebroadcasting Crystal Palace owing to Rowridge being without power.)

I had always assumed that Broadcasting House Switching Centre had fed Manchester straight to the distribution circuits once Open Air was underway, taking TV Centre out of circuit to sort itself out.

That said Nick Witchell does a bulletin into the emergency Breakfast Time from the newsroom studio so presumably the power is back on by that time.
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I wonder if these days you'd be able to get a studio back up and running and on air as quickly once the power returned as back then? There's so many computer systems these days that would need booting and setting up that it would probably take an age to get it all set up again.
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The many Price Drop TV power farces suggest that you are right - you can get something on screen but it's probably going to be an emergency service with lots of issues.
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(19-07-2024, 09:19 PM)Steve in Pudsey Wrote:  The many Price Drop TV power farces suggest that you are right - you can get something on screen but it's probably going to be an emergency service with lots of issues.

In fairness it wasn't unique to Price Drop, it was the whole Sit-Up network. Anybody would probably be forgiven for thinking the whole operation was powered by hamsters on wheels. Big Grin
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