BBC News Pres: 2022 - Present

(26-09-2022, 09:22 AM)Steve in Pudsey Wrote:  When you consider that Germany's Chancellor is equivalent to our Prime Minister it all gets very muddy

Though Germany's Chancellor is actually one of the few examples of a non-standard term being universally accepted. Typically, Heads of Government are simply called Prime Minister regardless of the official English name - Italy's PM, for instance, is officially the President of the Council of Ministers, but always called the Prime Minister. Germany seem to have a knack at getting through these conventions - it's not uncommon to see the German parliament called the Bundestag or The Left party called Die Linke in English-language publications.
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(26-09-2022, 10:33 AM)DTV Wrote:  
(26-09-2022, 09:22 AM)Steve in Pudsey Wrote:  When you consider that Germany's Chancellor is equivalent to our Prime Minister it all gets very muddy

Though Germany's Chancellor is actually one of the few examples of a non-standard term being universally accepted. Typically, Heads of Government are simply called Prime Minister regardless of the official English name - Italy's PM, for instance, is officially the President of the Council of Ministers, but always called the Prime Minister. Germany seem to have a knack at getting through these conventions - it's not uncommon to see the German parliament called the Bundestag or The Left party called Die Linke in English-language publications.
Not forgetting the Irish Taoiseach.

Sky News broadcasts internationally and has no issues using the terms Chancellor of the Exchequer and Health Secretary (although the latter is actually the English Health Secretary). I watched CNN the other day and they referred to the Chancellor as 'The British Chancellor of the Exchequer'.

'Finance Minister' is not quite right as we have finance ministers, such as the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and it just gets confusing, especially if Kwasi Kwarteng's name isn't mentioned in context.

How will it work with the Radio 5 Live simulcast? They're not seriously going to say 'Finance Minister' instead of Chancellor, surely?

Also, its going to sound strange and messy if the studio presenter leads into a package by saying 'The British Finance Minister' only for the reporter or correspondent to say Chancellor during the piece (which will likely happen if its a package that was used or intended for the 1, 6 or 10 domestic bulletins originally).

It's actually quite simple, just use the British term.
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(26-09-2022, 10:42 AM)Worzel Wrote:  Not forgetting the Irish Taoiseach.

Sky News broadcasts internationally and has no issues using the terms Chancellor of the Exchequer and Health Secretary (although the latter is actually the English Health Secretary). I watched CNN the other day and they referred to the Chancellor as 'The British Chancellor of the Exchequer'.

'Finance Minister' is not quite right as we have finance ministers, such as the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and it just gets confusing, especially if Kwasi Kwarteng's name isn't mentioned in context.

How will it work with the Radio 5 Live simulcast? They're not seriously going to say 'Finance Minister' instead of Chancellor, surely?

Also, its going to sound strange and messy if the studio presenter leads into a package by saying 'The British Finance Minister' only for the reporter or correspondent to say Chancellor during the piece (which will likely happen if its a package that was used or intended for the 1, 6 or 10 domestic bulletins originally).

It's actually quite simple, just use the British term.

The Irish Taoiseach is often referred to as the Irish Prime Minister in English-language media, it is simply not in the same bracket of ubiquity as the German Chancellor.

Sky News might be available internationally, but to say it broadcasts internationally in the same respect as BBC World News or the planned BBC News is absurd.

Britain's finance minister is the Chancellor of the Exchequer, not the Financial Secretary to the Treasury (a junior ministerial position who is unlikely to do anything newsworthy). When we were in the EU, it was the Chancellor who sat on the Economic and Financial Affairs Council on a par with other European finance ministers.

Radio 5 Live simulcasts aren't being shown internationally, so why would this be an issue.

Which is why my preference was always for "...the Chancellor, Britain's finance minister,...", but this was deemed too clunky back on the purple place. I have no problem using the term Chancellor if, and only if, the term is explained. The parochial only British terms for a British broadcaster position is simply a bad way to run an international news channel. The priority should always be ensuring the audience understands what you are talking about, especially when using unfamiliar and unintuitive terminology - like Chancellor of the Exchequer.
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(26-09-2022, 11:31 AM)DTV Wrote:  
(26-09-2022, 10:42 AM)Worzel Wrote:  Not forgetting the Irish Taoiseach.

Sky News broadcasts internationally and has no issues using the terms Chancellor of the Exchequer and Health Secretary (although the latter is actually the English Health Secretary). I watched CNN the other day and they referred to the Chancellor as 'The British Chancellor of the Exchequer'.

'Finance Minister' is not quite right as we have finance ministers, such as the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and it just gets confusing, especially if Kwasi Kwarteng's name isn't mentioned in context.

How will it work with the Radio 5 Live simulcast? They're not seriously going to say 'Finance Minister' instead of Chancellor, surely?

Also, its going to sound strange and messy if the studio presenter leads into a package by saying 'The British Finance Minister' only for the reporter or correspondent to say Chancellor during the piece (which will likely happen if its a package that was used or intended for the 1, 6 or 10 domestic bulletins originally).

It's actually quite simple, just use the British term.

The Irish Taoiseach is often referred to as the Irish Prime Minister in English-language media, it is simply not in the same bracket of ubiquity as the German Chancellor.

Sky News might be available internationally, but to say it broadcasts internationally in the same respect as BBC World News or the planned BBC News is absurd.

Britain's finance minister is the Chancellor of the Exchequer, not the Financial Secretary to the Treasury (a junior ministerial position who is unlikely to do anything newsworthy). When we were in the EU, it was the Chancellor who sat on the Economic and Financial Affairs Council on a par with other European finance ministers.

Radio 5 Live simulcasts aren't being shown internationally, so why would this be an issue.

Which is why my preference was always for "...the Chancellor, Britain's finance minister,...", but this was deemed too clunky back on the purple place. I have no problem using the term Chancellor if, and only if, the term is explained. The parochial only British terms for a British broadcaster position is simply a bad way to run an international news channel. The priority should always be ensuring the audience understands what you are talking about, especially when using unfamiliar and unintuitive terminology - like Chancellor of the Exchequer.
We're going to have to politely disagree with each other. But that's the great thing about healthy debate and differing opinions.  Smile
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(26-09-2022, 09:22 AM)Steve in Pudsey Wrote:  When you consider that Germany's Chancellor is equivalent to our Prime Minister it all gets very muddy

Exactly, and the BBC has never referred to "German Prime Minister" from fear it may confuse people. They just say "Chancellor" and do you know what, people just get it.

I'm sure BBC World News referring to Chancellor of the Exchequer wouldn't confuse many, and those it does will just Google it.

(26-09-2022, 11:31 AM)DTV Wrote:  The parochial only British terms for a British broadcaster position is simply a bad way to run an international news channel. The priority should always be ensuring the audience understands what you are talking about, especially when using unfamiliar and unintuitive terminology - like Chancellor of the Exchequer.
So the BBC shouldn't use the terms nappy, pavement and torch then, since most of the audience would use diaper, sidewalk and flashlight?
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