BBC to explore how to reform the TVL, the DG says
#31

(29-03-2024, 11:06 AM)tellyblues Wrote:  Recently it's got to the point that people are bored of the same old same old and shows on streaming platforms aren't popular just because they're on streaming platforms (although I do think that some things can be over-egged) but because they're good.

Increasingly it's actually "same old same old" coumfort programming that people are turning to streamers for. The most streamed show on Netflix in the US last year was Suits and the rest of the top ten was entirely aquired shows from traditional telly, old and new, too. Netflix would be nothing without the vast catalogue of acquired shows it's built it's empire on. It's still these shows that most subscribers are watching.
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#32

(29-03-2024, 11:51 AM)Kim Wexler’s Ponytail Wrote:  Increasingly it's actually "same old same old" coumfort programming that people are turning to streamers for. The most streamed show on Netflix in the US last year was Suits and the rest of the top ten was entirely aquired shows from traditional telly, old and new, too. Netflix would be nothing without the vast catalogue of acquired shows it's built it's empire on. It's still these shows that most subscribers are watching.

I don't know enough about TV in the US and what shows are airing where and if Suits for example has been available on traditional broadcast TV since ending, but if it were the case, how prominent was it? That makes a difference.

In the UK though people don't just have Netflix so they can watch old shows. Maybe UK broadcasters can't get certain shows because they've already been locked into exclusivity contracts with streamers but it's also the case that UK broadcasters even if they could afford it wouldn't show US stuff here because too many viewers would turn their noses up at US shows, partly because they've got into set ways of watching certain programmes at certain times which I class as the "same old same old". Shows that are on Netflix, whether old or new, aren't "same old same old" if they aren't airing on terrestrial TV or part of viewers' normal watching habits.
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#33

People certainly come to Netflix for the new shows but think the stats show it is actually the archive content which ends up being streamed the most - though in the US that's partly down to archive shows often having a couple of hundred episodes and new shows having 10.

The current UK top 10 on Netflix though includes the BBC miniseries Gunpowder (which was co-produced with HBO) and strangely two seasons of noughties ITV drama Fat Friends - the sort of relatively low budget very British primetime comedy drama which is somewhat disappearing from our screens. Also in there is the first season of noughties US detective drama Monk.
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#34

Suits was spun off at least once and was popular enough on Netflix and Peacock to get the green light on another spin-off. It was originally a cable show I believe. I don't think its appeared outside of whatever network it was on save for streaming and probably syndication somewhere.

Apparently Dave picked it up for the UK, but for whatever reason lost interest (ratings most likely?) and Netflix hoovered it up.

Terrestrial TV doesn't air much US content now save for anything really big or they can get really cheap as a shot to nothing, Sky had (or had) a deal for a lot of the regular stuff that props up Sky Atlantic and anything that's left can go to anybody who waves a cheque book around.

Interesting to note though, we always look West for acquired mainstream content. Its probably only BBC Four now that actually airs the occasional show from Europe or further East - and often in their original language with subtitles. That and a whole swathe of varying quality of dubs into English of Dutch/Danish stuff floating around on Netflix and Prime.
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#35

When you have to pay for the TVL even if you might only watch channels that are not officially available to view in the UK, just shows that the TVL system as it stands right now is legalised extortion that demands money with menaces. It needs to stop. The BBC should be forced to find its own funding. If that means going commercial, then so be it.

I used to agree that if the BBC went commercial, the other commercial broadcasters would have a problem with it, but that view has changed now that some paid streaming services now show adverts. ITV, Channel 4 and 5 and Sky would still complain if the BBC started showing ads, but they'll still manage either way. The BBC takes in advertising revenue already via some of its commercial activities. The BBC owns BBC Studios, which 100% owns UKTV, which shows ads on all its channels.


And FFS people need to stop referring to DTT as Freeview when it is not actaully free to view while it still requires the TVL to take full advantage of it..



(I know this message might ruffle some feathers, but that is my opinion.)
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#36

(07-04-2024, 08:30 PM)TheGregmeister Wrote:  I used to agree that if the BBC went commercial, the other commercial broadcasters would have a problem with it, but that view has changed now that some paid streaming services now show adverts. ITV, Channel 4 and 5 and Sky would still complain if the BBC started showing ads, but they'll still manage either way.

They're barely managing as it is, and that's before we've really seen the impact of streaming services introducing ads, which would be a drop in the ocean compared to the BBC putting them on the most watched TV channels in the country.

If the BBC went commercial their advertising wouldn't come principles from increases in advertising budgets but from their competitors. That would see the UK television industry significantly reduced which reduces the services available to the public and reduces the industries contribution to the economy.
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#37

The BBC gets over £5billion in revenue with the TVL and commercial income combined, so how the hell is the BBC "barely managing" ... ?!?

To say the BBC is "barely managing" when it has over £5billion to play with is complete and utter BS.
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#38

(07-04-2024, 09:50 PM)TheGregmeister Wrote:  The BBC gets over £5billion in revenue with the TVL and commercial income combined, so how the hell is the BBC "barely managing" ... ?!?

To say the BBC is "barely managing" when it has over £5billion to play with is complete and utter BS.

I believe he's saying that the commercial channels are barely managing.
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#39

In a relief to the people at the top of the BBC, Prime Minister Sir Keir Starmer has committed to keeping the BBC Licence Fee. The concerns about the amount of households who pay the fee are going down must remain, but it must be a relief and hope going forward of a more positive relationship than with the previous government.

www.theguardian.com 
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#40

Yes at some point it needs to change in terms of what it's collected from. It can't continue to be a license for having a TV much longer.

Whether that changes to a surcharge on broadband or some sort of tax or central government funding needs deciding. Hopefully within the next 5 years, it's not only long overdue but they don't want to leave it until there might be government with a less positive attitude to the BBC
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